Guest post: Speed Mentoring. The fast and furious way to network!

The following post is a a guest post by Joanna Hare. Joanna is a  a coordinator of Hong Kong Libraries Connect (HKLC). More information, including links to HKLC blog and project, is included at the bottom of the post. 


Greetings from Hong Kong! Today I’d like to share with you a networking activity we hosted last year as a way to launch our inaugural mentoring program: Speed Mentoring!

Speed mentoring
Speed mentoring event (www.hklibconnect.org)

In early 2017 we launched a pilot mentoring program as a means to nurture LIS students, and provide an opportunity for students and professionals to gather and talk about the profession in Hong Kong in an informal, low-pressure atmosphere. We wanted to host a special event to officially launch the program. To give the whole group a chance to talk to a broad range of people, as well as identify potential partnerships, we decided to coordinate a speed mentoring session.

(For anyone unfamiliar with the term, it is based on ‘Speed Dating’, where a large group of participants gather to have ‘speed dates’. Each date is usually under 10 minutes, meaning participants are able to meet lots of different potential partners and decide if they might like to meet that person again for a more formal date.) Continue reading

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Library and Information Services New Professionals Network (LISNPN)

by Tina Reynolds

I have been a member of the Library and Information Services New Professionals Network for a few months now but the official launch came in July and since then it has become an increasingly useful tool for networking and discussion.

The network is the brain child of Ned Potter (aka thewikiman) who is also one of the New Professionals Support Officers within the CILIP sub group CDG. He has created a forum for new professionals to make contacts, share problems, access resources and gain inspiration from the achievements of others.

The network can be found at http://www.lisnpn.spruz.com/ and I would encourage all new professionals to join. A few experienced professionals have also signed up in order to share their wisdom and this is also something which is encouraged.

Some of the many features of the site include anonymous reviews of LIS courses, example portfolios, a range of ‘how to’ guides including getting published, presentation skills and networking, an RSS feed for LIS jobs and discussions on numerous topics ranging from marketing and education in libraries to travel to work to Drum and Bass!

The major selling point of this website is that it is completely open. It does not matter whether you are a member of a particular professional body or none at all. The idea is to allow anyone who is interested and feels they can gain something or help someone else out should join.

I look forward to seeing many of you there!

——

Tina ReynoldsTina Reynolds is currently studying Information and Library Management at Northumbria University. She is also New Professionals Support Officer for CILIP’s Career Development Group for London and the South East and serves on the CILIP in London Committee. She is an active member of a number of professional bodies including SLA Europe, BIALL, CLIG and NGLIS. She is currently collaborating on a project to create a UK events wiki with a contact from LISNPN.

Contact: tinareynolds@djdeloitte.co.uk | Facebook | LinkedIn | LISNPN

 

I have been a member of Library and Information Sector New Professionals Network for a few months now but the official launch came in July and since then it has become an increasingly useful tool for networking and discussion.

The network is the brain child of Ned Potter (aka thewikiman) who is also one of the New Professionals Support Officers within the CILIP sub group CDG. He has created a forum for new professionals to make contacts, share problems, access resources and gain inspiration from the achievements of others.

The network can be found at http://www.lisnpn.spruz.com/ and I would encourage all new professionals to join. A few experienced professionals have also signed up in order to share their wisdom and this is also something which is encouraged.

Some of the many features of the site include anonymous reviews of LIS courses, example portfolios, a range of ‘how to’ guides including getting published, presentation skills and networking, an RSS feed for LIS jobs and discussions on numerous topics ranging from marketing and education in libraries to travel to work to Drum and Bass!

The major selling point of this website is that it is completely open. It does not matter whether you are a member of a particular professional body or none at all. The idea is to allow anyone who is interested and feels they can gain something or help someone else out should join.

I look forward to seeing many of you there!